Autism Screening Tops the President’s Medical To-Do List

By Nancy Shute, US News and World Report

Whitehouse.gov launched at 12:01 pm Wednesday, even before the new president had taken his oath of office on the Capitol’s West Front.

Autism is the only disorder or disease mentioned explicitly in Obama’s 24-point agenda.
Heart disease and cancer don’t get the call. Neither does diabetes, or other chronic diseases. But there are four hefty bullet points addressing autism.

Obama called for:
1. Increased funding for research, treatment, screenings, public awareness and support services for
autism spectrum disorders.

2. “Life-long services” for people with autism spectrum disorders, as children and as adults. Many parents struggle to find and pay for screening and treatments for their children, but there is even less coverage and capacity for adults with autism-based impairments.

3. More funding for the 2006 Combating Autism Act, as well as improving state and federal autism programs.

4. Universal screening for all infants for autism disorders, as well as re-screening for all 2-year-olds. This is the biggie; children are currently screened only if parents or pediatricians voice a concern, so too many children aren’t diagnosed until they enter elementary school. The earlier treatment starts, the more effective it is, and a national screening program would help reduce the number of kids falling through the cracks. It would also be a huge undertaking, at a time when both government and privately insured health care is foundering.

That second bullet point would be a huge help for families who are struggling to provide care. In a recent survey, 52 percent of parents of children with autism said their

family finances were drained by treatment and care, compared to 13 percent of typical families.

The 2006 Combating Autism act promised almost $1 billion over five years for autism research and development, but Congress hadn’t appropriated $200 million per year, even before the economy hit the skids. The Obama manifesto gives a big fat hint that for autism, at least, the hard times cited in the new president’s inaugural address won’t mean big cuts in funding.

Still, universal screening for autism will be a huge challenge. There’s no blood test that can be used to diagnose autism, as there is for hereditary diseases like galactosemia and sickle cell, which are screened for using a heel stick while a newborn is still in the hospital.

With autism, parents and doctors instead need to observe a child and look for delays in language, social interactions, and gross motor skills. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that pediatricians screen children during well-baby visits at 9 months, 18 months, and 24 or 30 months. (Here’s the CDC’s page on screening for autism.) But many doctors don’t get around to doing those screens, and until very recently the recommended tests weren’t sensitive enough to pick up mild autism spectrum disorders.

Early screening for autism is a terrific idea. Making it happen will be a tall order, even for the can-do Obama team.

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