Boo!-ks

Books are a wonderful way to introduce the new concepts and vocabulary related to holidays.  Here are some Halloween books that can be integrated into your child’s ABA program.

-   Where is Baby’s Pumpkin?  By Karen Katz  – A lift-the-flap toddler book.  Great for practicing following instructions, protodeclarative pointing, and learning Halloween labels.

-  Spooky, Spooky, Spooky! By Cathy MacLennon  – An exciting, adorable, and only slightly spooky introduction to Halloween critters for preschoolers and kindergarteners.  Wonderful for practicing choral responding, generalizing colors, animals and object labels, and practicing descriptions and attributes.

- The Spooky Wheels on the Bus By J. Elizabeth Mills – A spooky version of everyone’s favorite preschool song!  Count the creepies and sing along with new seasonally appropriate lyrics.

- Glad Monster, Sad Monster, A Book About Feelings  By Ed Emberly and Anne Miranda – Another fun book for pre-K and early elementary.  Generalize emotions and talk about emotional cause and effect with these goofy colorful monsters.

- The Biggest Pumpkin Ever By Steven Kroll – A country mouse and a city mouse both tend the same pumpkin, unbeknownst to each other.  Appropriate for ages 4-8 and perfect for generalizing social cognitive concepts, including beliefs, intentions and perspective taking.

- The Bernstein Bears Trick or Treat By Stan & Jan Bernstein – A creepy neighbor turns out to be nice! Good for practicing social cognitive skills, particularly intentions and deception.  It can also be used as a starting point for discussing safe trick-or-treat behaviors.

- Halloween Mad Libs Jr. An elementary school classic!  Mad libs give children a structured opportunity to practice turn taking, conversation skills,academic language skills, listening comprehension, flexibilities and absurdities, including social humor.

There are also activities in the Skills® curriculum to focus on teaching the concepts mentioned in each book’s description.  Visit http://www.skillsforautism.com to learn more.

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