Author Archives: Ali Aguilar

Expand Your Definition of ABA

Capture

Did you know ABA (Applied Behavior Analysis) goes way beyond, “Come here?” and, “What color?” ABA has a reputation of being limited to teaching functional skills, simple academics and basic language and social skills. In reality, these limitations only exist when service providers lack the resources (funding) for a comprehensive program and/or lack training in current applications of ABA.

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December 2012 Smart Art = Smarty!

Smarty

Have you seen the new Smarty videos on Autism Live? Skills® is sponsoring this new monthly series, so I got a sneak peek. I absolutely love them!

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Emergency Preparedness – Part 2

Emergency

Have you made your disaster kit yet? I’ll admit, mine is still a work in progress, but I’m determined to have it done before Christmas!

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Reaching Across the Aisle

Aisle

Opportunities like Thea’s give behavior analysts a chance to increase the understanding of ABA to those outside the field. If we continue to interact and collaborate with as well as learn from and educate professionals in the educational and medical fields we have a very exciting future. The benefit for practitioners is huge, but the benefit to our clients and students is incalculable.

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Boo!-ks

Books

Books are a wonderful way to introduce the new concepts and vocabulary related to holidays. Here are some Halloween books that can be integrated into your child’s ABA program.

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Trick-Or-Treat!

Trick or Treat

Halloween is around the corner! One of my favorite Halloween activities is practice trick-or-treat. This can be as simple or elaborate as you like. All you really need is a door, a bag and a treat, but it might be fun to incorporate dress-up clothes or have a Halloween dress rehearsal.

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Teaching Sarcasm

Sarcasm

One of the reasons my daughter struggled to understand my explanation of sarcasm, other than the sub-par definition and the fact that she’s still a little shaky on the meaning of “opposite,” is because the ability to detect sarcasm and irony doesn’t develop until ages 5 or 6. In neurotypical children, this skill continues to develop into early teens (Creusere, 2000; Dews et al., 1996; Harris & Pexman, 2003; Pexman et al., 2011). For children with ASDs (ASD), understanding and using non-literal and counterfactual language, like sarcasm, is particularly difficult.

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