Tagged behavior

A Review of Assessments Used to Select Content for EIBI Programs

With the current pool of available assessments, clinicians are left to run a battery of tests in order to identify target skills to include in treatment. Furthermore, to fill in the gaps, clinicians are likely to rely on clinical judgment derived from individual preference, experience, and expertise rather than a thorough assessment of the child’s development. Although extensive research has shown EIBI to be an effective treatment for ASD, research has also revealed great variability in program design and treatment effectiveness across service providers. Current clinical practices in assessment and program design likely account for much of the variability seen in the quality of EIBI services today.

Don’t Worry, He Will Grow Out of It!

When parents talk to pediatricians and educational professionals about an undesirable behavior, it is not uncommon to be told that many children will “grow out” of that behavior. This is often reassuring for parents because it means, 1) other children also engage in this undesirable behavior, and 2) the undesirable behavior might go away on its own. As a parent it is easy to think “If other typical children are also engaging in this behavior it must not be a huge problem,” and “Other children have ‘grown out’ of this behavior, so I don’t have to do anything except wait…


They drive her 400 miles per week, so that she can get a few hours of ABA services, and they are doing whatever they can to cobble together something resembling a full-time, intensive ABA program. They are retired – they are supposed to be traveling and playing golf.

Challenging Behavior and Symptom Severity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

In a recent study, CARD researchers Jina Jang, Dr. Dennis Dixon, Dr. Jonathan Tarbox, and Dr. Doreen Granpeesheh found a relationship between symptom severity and challenging behavior in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Children with ASD are often reported to display challenging behavior (e.g., aggression, tantrums, self-injury, stereotypy, etc.); however, research examining the prevalence of challenging behavior in this population is limited. The purpose of the current study was to explore the incidence of challenging behavior and the relationship between symptom severity and challenging behavior in children with ASD receiving early intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI) services.