Tagged Jack Riley

The A-Word, Autism Part 30: Advancing Skills

Every skill he learns builds on the next to create a comprehensive skillset which will facilitate appropriate communication and interaction. Each week represents tangible progress. To witness the progress, stay tuned and check out earlier episodes as well.

The A-Word, Autsim Episode 29: Being Affectionate

Today Jack Riley is more interested in playing with others than his toys. Social interaction is becoming more motivating for him which is a good thing. Jack Riley’s isn’t the only one in affectionate mood, dad is also enjoying his time with him.

The A-Word, Autism Part 27: Providing Solutions For Noncompliance And Biting

In this week’s episode, we learn that outings have become an issue for Cheryl and Mike as Jack Riley has been attempting to bite his therapists and his mother out of aggression. Jessica takes Jack Riley on a walk outside with the family to determine the antecedent (what happens before the behavior of biting) , and the consequence (what happens after the behavior). Once this is determined, it will allow her to modify Jack Riley’s behavior.

The A-Word, Autism Part 26: Struggling With Expectations

In this episode, Mike discusses his concerns over Jack Riley’s recent tantrums and general non-compliance during outings. Mike shares with Jessica his hopes and concerns about his son’s future and how autism may shape that.
For more information about ABA Therapy go to http://centerforautism.com

The A-word, Autism Part 25: Playing is Learning

At two years of age, for learning to be effective for Jack Riley, it needs to be centered around play. To make every moment is a teaching moment, Jessica uses toys that are motivating for Jack Riley to incorporate into lessons they are working on.

The A-Word, Part 24: Gaining Attention

As Jack Riley’s language skills expand, so do his social skills. Jessica is teaching Jack Riley how to appropriately gain attention from others. As the skill is new to Jack Riley, Jessica prompts him the entire way using visual, physical, and vocal prompts until he learns how to gain others attention independently.

The A-Word, Part 22: Tacting and Joint Attention

After six months of ABA therapy, Jack Riley has become significantly more vocal. He now consistently labels items and mands. In this epidode, we observe as Jack Riley tacts with joint attention, which is a major accomplishment as lack of joint attention is a key identifying sign of autism.